Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Back to back acquisitions are adding to the excitement in the Flash arena. As Pure Storage pulled in another $150M in Series E funding and EMC was putting the finishing touches to its VNX2 with an all-Flash option complete with controller and software enhancements, even bigger Flash news was brewing.

Western Digital/HGST announced acquisition of PCIe Flash and software company, Virident, for $685 million on September 9. This is the third Flash acquisition the company has made in recent months. After acquiring SSD veteran, sTec, for $340 million, WD/HGST apparently beat Seagate to the punch in acquiring cache company, VeloBit, for an undisclosed sum. Seagate, along with Cisco, was also an investor in Virident.

On September 10, Cisco announced that it will purchase Flash array vendor, WhipTail, for $415 million. Undoubtedly there are folks out there humming along to the tune of the “Hokey Pokey” and wondering how serious Cisco is about storage as it expands its Unified Computing System.

It’s appears that the ability to aggregate, manage and manipulate Flash through software is a good place to be as the market moves towards consolidation.

Fusion-io and Violin will certainly be under increased scrutiny as the industry-wide game of musical chairs progresses. Will Seagate ever manage to snag a Flash chair? What shall we see at Oracle Open World in a few weeks?

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management, security, cloud and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

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FIDO - making fast work of secure online data access.

FIDO – making fast work of secure online data access.

Have you ever given up on reading an article or buying something online because you forgot one of your many passwords? If password management stymies you, then join me in the small joyful anticipation that comes with the news that BlackBerry has joined the FIDO Alliance.

Fast IDentity Online (FIDO) looks like the best hope on the horizon for securing online access to data. Mind you, it’s looking like a pretty far horizon. The FIDO Alliance was formed over a year ago by Agnitio, Infineon Technologies, Lenovo, Nok Nok Labs, PayPal, and Validity. FIDO’s noble aim is to change the nature of authentication by developing specifications that define an open, scalable, interoperable set of mechanisms that supplant reliance on passwords to securely authenticate users of online services. This new standard for security devices and browser plugins will allow any website or cloud application to interface with a broad variety of existing and future FIDO-enabled devices that the user has for online security. I, for one, can’t wait!

FIDO is expanding membership and, in addition to BlackBerry, has added Allweb Technologies, Check2Protect, Crocus Technology, CrucialTec, Diamond Fortress Technologies, Entersekt, Fingerprint Cards (FPC), Google, Insyndia Global and NXP Semiconductors.

As data security becomes an ever more pressing concern for users and IT pros alike, storage vendors would do well to delve deeper than encryption when adding security innovation. Consider how a tight coupling of authenticated users and access devices with underlying storage could transform the cloud market. A while back, SNIA had a storage security tutorial that talked about trusted platform modules in storage devices. That seems like a likely connection point with FIDO.

Maybe it’s the canine association (Fido is a dog’s name after all) that makes me optimistic, but I really hope that the FIDO Alliance gets the support it needs to quickly come up with a globally beneficial standard that will make all of our online data more securely accessible.

FIDO Alliance: http://fidoalliance.org/

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management, security, and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

FMS 13 Banner

I am delighted to be chairing what may be the first ever marketing-oriented session at the annual Flash Memory Summit in August 2013. A lively panel of experts, editors, and analysts will be discussing product differentiation in a growth market in a session called: Differentiate or Die – Marketing Flash-Based Storage Systems on Wednesday, August 14, 9:50-10:50 am. This is an Open Session so you can register for free up until 8/11/13.

Product differentiation is a strategically important topic for businesses that develop products using using flash memory. It’s important because there are many ways to position such products, competition is fierce, and the process of positioning (or repositioning) is difficult, costly, and time-consuming. To succeed, these flash-based products must appeal to as many customers as possible. They must also appeal to the press, analysts, and investors.

Are these constituencies looking for the same things? Are they still responding to technology underpinnings such as SLC or MLC, or benchmarks such as latency and IOPS?  Do they focus on features such as on-the-fly de-dupe, reliability and price, or are they more responsive to benefits such as TCO and ROI? Or, are they looking to solve problems with Big Data, cloud, databases, and virtualization?  And in the end, do any of these details matter more than the brand name on the box?

Great Panel of Opinionated Experts

So who can help us answer these questions? It would be great to ask all the buyers directly, but we don’t have that luxury. Besides the logistical challenges, each buyer represents just one viewpoint in a large and diverse marketplace. However, the press and analysts have their fingers on the pulse of the broader market. They communicate with the broader market and they’ve been on the receiving end of almost every vendor pitch. Additionally, the buyers look to these people to help them form their opinions on the best SSDs for their situation. So, we’ve invited some of the most knowledgeable people in the SSD industry to share their opinions on what matters. They include some of the smartest, most experienced editors, analysts and VCs in the industry:

Panel Photos

Rich Castagna, Editorial Director, Storage Media at TechTarget. Rich oversees content for Storage Magazine, SearchSolidStateStorage.com, SearchStorage.com, SearchVirtualStorage.com, SearchCloudStorage.com, SearchDataBackup.com, SearchSMBStorage.com, SearchDisasterRecovery.com, SearchStorage.co.UK, SearchStorageChannel.com and Storage Decisions seminars and conferences. Rich has been involved with high-tech journalism for more than 20 years; previously, he was executive editor of ZDNet Tech Update and Cnet Enterprise; editor in chief of Windows Systems magazine; senior editor for Windows magazine, and senior editor and technical editor for PC Sources. Rich has written more than 600 computer technology articles.

Mark Peters, Senior Analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group. Mark is an ESG senior analyst focused on storage systems. His particular areas of emphasis are block storage; virtualized storage; all types of solid-state storage; and the challenges of power, cooling, and space efficiency in data centers. Mark has more than 25 years of data storage industry experience and has held senior management roles in sales, marketing, product management, business development, and customer intimacy in the U.S. and internationally.

Chris Preimesberger, Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis, eWEEK. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager’s Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work.

Gaurav Tewari, Director at SAP Ventures. Gaurav is a venture capitalist focused on growth and later-stage investments within Software/SaaS, Internet, Digital Media, Mobile, and Technology-Enabled Services. Prior to joining SAP Ventures he was with Highland Capital Partners and led or was instrumental in their investments in Violin Memory, Criteo, Marin Software (MRIN), , Affine Systems, Beyond the Rack, Cafemom, Coremetrics (IBM), Navic Networks (MSFT), Rent the Runway, StyleFeeder (TWX), and Yipit.  Previously, he was a Corporate Strategy executive at Microsoft, and a management consultant with McKinsey & Company, where he led strategic initiatives for Fortune 500 companies.

Frank Berry, Senior Analyst with IT Brand Pulse, a trusted source of product testing, IT Pro research and industry analysis about data center infrastructure. Prior to founding IT Brand Pulse, Frank was vice president of product marketing for QLogic, and vice president of worldwide marketing for Quantum.

David Lamont, Partner, Marketingsage. I am a marketing professional and strategist with over 25 years of storage experience, including 10 years marketing solid state products. I’ve helped large storage vendors including IBM and Seagate as well as innovative storage and Flash vendors such as Texas Memory Systems, Tegile and GridIron Systems. I share insights on Flash, storage and marketing topics on this blog and on the Words To The Wise section of Marketingsage website. I am a founding partner at Marketingsage, an agency that helps storage marketers with content development, publicity and lead generation.

About this Series on Positioning and The Flash Memory Summit

You can follow this blog by signing up in the left sidebar. You can find related posts like these by clicking the Flash Memory Summit 2013 category:

  1. The Positioning Game: 75+ Vendors Promoting an Enterprise Solution that Uses Flash Memory
  2. Competitive Positioning of Flash-Based Products – A Primer for CEOs, CTOs and Marketers
  3. Market Changes Impacting Flash-based Products – A Positioning Primer for CEOs, CTOs and Marketers
  4. Positioning and Hype for Flash-based Products – A Primer for CEOs, CTOs and Marketers

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About the Author

David X. Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management, and enterprise software products. He can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join his network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

We’ve all been duly awed by the Dell buyout announcement. Over the years, the company has amassed quite a portfolio of storage and data protection and management offerings, having acquired companies such as EqualLogic, Compellent, Quest, AppAssure and SonicWall. Although many of these acquisitions brought robust technology and contributed handily to Dell’s revenue, the company never made the transition to becoming a storage company. This begs the question as to what will now happen to these lines as Dell sharpens its focus and remakes itself into a seller of products rather than an architect of share valuations. Only the most naïve amongst us harbors any ideas that the latest chapter in Dell’s story might lead to storage innovation and a bid for leadership in the space.

Only 3% of Dell’s revenue is from storage, with software and peripherals yielding 16%, of which data protection software is a part. The overall business distribution is more even with 30% of net revenue coming from large enterprise, 20% from consumer and 25% each from SMB and public sector organizations.

Anecdotally, Dell does not exercise the kind of account control as players such as EMC, IBM, Oracle, or Cisco.

HP has not been shy in making generalized predatory rumblings about picking over Dell’s portfolio, and I suspect Dell is a subject of strategic debate in many more functional boardrooms too. Wouldn’t you love to be a fly on the wall over at EMC and NetApp? These storage giants, along with the myriad of smaller storage and data protection vendors, are no doubt strategizing furiously about how to woo customers and key talent away.

On the face of things, storage and data protection represent relatively small, albeit growing, potatoes to Dell. But in the highly competitive mid-tier storage market, these potatoes undoubtedly look mighty appetizing. Dell will need to make big moves quickly if it’s going to keep control of its pricey ($24.5 billion) lunch. In any case, the storage market is sure to heat up over the coming months.

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management, security, and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

Of all the horrible jobs to have, it seems that marketing and IT are the worst.  CareerBliss recently surveyed thousands of people and identified the 10 jobs with the highest levels of employee unhappiness. I expected to see yucky and dangerous jobs on the list: rodent abatement; sewer maintenance; oil rig diving and the like. So imagine my surprise when I saw the list populated with many of the roles I’ve played and been close to in my own clean and happy little world! Here’s the list:

1. Director of Information Technology (“nepotism, cronyism, disrespect for workers”)

2. Director of Sales and Marketing (“lack of direction from upper management and an absence of room for growth”)

3. Product Manager (“the work is boring and there’s a lot of clerical work”)

4. Senior Web Developer (“employers are unable to communicate coherently, and lack an understanding of the technology”)

5. Technical Specialist (“treated with a palpable level of disrespect, lack of communication from upper management, and input was not taken seriously)

6. Electronics Technician (“too little control, work schedule, lack of accomplishment, no real opportunity for growth, peers have no motivation to work hard, no say in how things are done, hostility from peers towards other employees”)

7. Law Clerk (“hours are long and grueling, and the clerk is subject to the whims of sometimes mercurial personalities, a median salary of $39,780)

8. Technical Support Analyst (“may be required to travel at a moment’s notice, sometimes on holidays or weekends”, and “You can do better, really.”)

9. CNC Machinist (“no room for advancement”)

10. Marketing Manager (“lack of direction”, “tolerable,” “It’s a job.”)

Life as a marketing agency partner is great and I love it. Admittedly I work in a non-political environment with smart and funny people who have the grace to always refill the coffee pot. But I’ve also held jobs and roles equivalent to numbers 1, 2, 3, and 10 on the list and worked very closely with 4, 5, 6, and 8 in the corporate world for more years than I care to admit. Honestly, I was happy and I thought my colleagues were too (except for the disgruntled guy with the guns in tech support who shall remain nameless).

"I Don't Like Mondays" track by the Boomtown Rats

“I Don’t Like Mondays” YouTube track by the Boomtown Rats

I’ve always been excited by technology, software innovation, the magic that makes the internet and my printers work (I’m not a complete geek). The scar where I cut myself pulling cables under the data center floor healed, so the IT part was good. As a product manager I treated my products as children – nurturing them, advocating for them, trying to get them out the door on time with enough features to form a covering fabric of modesty. Practicing marketing is a passion and I have always been as happy as Larry the Cable Guy to “Git ‘r done” – default direction is to find folks and sell stuff.

Truly I am baffled that, of all the things that can make human beings unhappy, my career path accounts for so much of it in the workplace. The article by Daniel Burkszpan at CNBC is definitely worth a read and I’d love to hear your views on what makes a great and lousy job in technology marketing. By the way, chocolate makes everything seem better!

http://finance.yahoo.com/career-work/article/113308/10-most-hated-jobs-cnbc

http://www.cnbc.com/id/44038159?slide=1

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

IDC has just released its Worldwide Disk Storage Systems Quarterly Tracker for Q2 2011. The shipment of 5,353 petabytes in total disk storage systems capacity for the quarter represents a 10.2% increase in Q2 revenues compared to Q2 2010. Only Dell and the many hundreds of “Others” saw a decline in revenue.

It’s cheering to see some tangible evidence of prosperity and an uptick in IT spending. However, it behooves not only Dell and Oracle (Sun), but the smaller, emerging companies in the storage arena to pause and think strategically about how they can compete against EMC, IBM, NetApp, HP and Hitachi who jointly won 74% of the market in 2Q11.

Technical innovation is only a partial answer. When considering access to market, the conundrum is whether to try to beat them or join them.

Top 5 Vendors, Worldwide External Disk Storage Systems Factory Revenue, Second Quarter of 2011 (Revenues are in Millions)

Vendor

2Q11 Revenue

2Q11 Market Share

2Q10 Revenue

2Q10 Market Share

2Q11/2Q10 Revenue Growth

1. EMC

$1,621

28.7%

$1,287

25.6%

26.0%

T2. IBM

$771

13.7%

$680

13.5%

13.4%

T2. NetApp

$720

12.8%

$572

11.4%

25.7%

4. HP

$619

11.0%

$567

11.3%

9.1%

T5. Hitachi

$459

8.1%

$372

7.4%

23.3%

T5. Dell

$444

7.9%

$472

9.4%

-5.9%

Others

$1,009

17.9%

$1,080

21.5%

-6.6%

All Vendors

$5,643

100.0%

$5,031

100.0%

12.2%

Source: IDC Worldwide Disk Storage Systems Quarterly Tracker, September 2, 2011

Press release: http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS23012911

Report: http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=IDC_P4435

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).

In Scott Shane’s book “The Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths That Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By,” there’s a chart showing data the four-year survival rate for technology businesses at 38% – poor compared to other industries. Given the competitive and fast-paced nature of technology, that’s not too shocking. Great ideas and great people are not enough to ensure success. Time is, as they say, money.

Marketing cannot wait until the product is ready to ship. Although resources in the typical emerging company are constrained, and it may be premature to staff and build a full department, some aspects of product, channel, and communications marketing are crucial to early success. How else do you get the early customers, partners and capital on board and launch successfully? At Marketingsage, we see this gap between marketing needs and capabilities as an opportunity to affordably deliver a new and valuable service that we have named “Countdown” specifically for start-ups in the pre-launch phase.

Prior to launch, emerging IT companies frequently grapple with meaningful positioning for their company and product offering in the market, creating critical sales tools such as white papers, videos, case studies, training material, web content, prospect lists, beta programs and reseller programs. They struggle to generate influential pre-launch “buzz” among investors, analysts, journalists and business partners. Key to overcoming these challenges is combining deep product and market knowledge with a complete array of marketing services.

Too often, consultants can only advise on strategy and content, but can’t produce the actual materials, effectively increasing their client’s workload. Typical PR and creative agencies can’t create content from the ground up, articulate meaningful differentiation, nor create detailed prospect profiles because they don’t have the necessary depth of product and market knowledge. Working with multiple specialists and agencies is not only unwieldy, but far too expensive for a start-up who may be facing the imminent prospect of raising venture capital.

Here at Marketingsage we have deep corporate roots in data storage, data management and security products targeting enterprise and government customers through direct, reseller and/or OEM sales channels.  That makes it possible for us to combine the requisite depth of product and market knowledge with our full and integrated array of marketing and PR services and help ensure successful launches, while reducing the capital and time required by up to 50%.

Sorry if this all sounds a lot like a commercial, but I am really excited at how we have organized our capabilities to serve early-stage companies and promote the quest for TNBT (The Next Big Thing). More about Countdown at http://www.marketingsage.com/aboutsage-prelaunch.html

About the Author

Agnes Lamont is an accomplished marketer of IT products and a partner at Marketingsage, a PR and lead generation firm that specializes in marketing data storage, data management and enterprise software products. She can be reached by email at blog [at] marketingsage.net. Fellow marketers and IT professionals are invited to join her network on LinkedIn and to subscribe to this blog (see sidebar).